Newtown Hill

newtown-hill-sign

Newtown Hill conservation land offers an opportunity to enjoy nearly 100 acres of variety. As you begin to climb the paved access road, your eye is drawn upward across the rolling meadows to watch a broadwing hawk soaring and searching for food. On the right, grape vines and bittersweet nearly hide an old stone wall, the first of many surrounding the property. Daisies, Queen Ann’s lace, Indian paint brush, clover, milkweed, butter-and-eggs, black-eyed Susans: the pages of your wildflower book will move as fast as those of the birder’s ‘Peterson’.

When you reach the large boulder near the crest, sit awhile and enjoy the view eastward. On a clear day Boston’s skyline rises straight ahead. Rested, begin to descend toward the old apple trees on the right and continue onto the dirt road which leads you through the woods to the second meadow and a sylvan treat: a magnificent specimen beech tree – friend of lovers for generations, if you believe the carvings. Please don’t add to them.

In the spring time, as you leave the beech grove you may glimpse below through the trees the flooded meadow. This is a quaking peat bog and a refuge for migrating Canada geese and duck of several species. The meadow dries to a small pond in summer and tall grasses grow to invite the migrants on their fall return. The woods surrounding you are part of the Town Land but no trails have been cut. Pine, hemlock, ash, maple, birch and other trees grow by natural selection.

This land has always been useful to man – a meeting place, a look-out, a hidden spring, a fort, an apple orchard: each in its turn. Now under the management of the Conservation Commission, the meadow is hayed in summer by a local farmer, and skied on by hardy enthusiasts in the winter.

Acreage: 98 

Location

Turn off Newtown Road onto paved access road, located next to mailbox 559. Park on the left before the locked gate entrance to the water tower. There is room for several cars in a parking area.

Parking: Ample
Owned by: Town of Littleton
Restriction held by: LCC

Trails

One short trail leads from the field to the marsh and pond edge. A second trail leads from the 36” beech tree to the water tower.

Please use a direct path across the field (in the spring, summer, and fall) to the woods so that you do not damage the uncut hay.

History

This land was purchased by the citizens of Littleton in 1979.


Trail Map


Click to zoom in or out



Difficulty

Easy

Activities

  • Hiking
  • Birding
  • Wildlife Viewing

Cautions

A peat bog when wet will not support the weight of an adult. Poison ivy, briars, barbed wire. Ticks are common in the fields.

Steward(s)

Richard Buckles

Properties